Discussion:
to be or not to be....
(too old to reply)
Ron Button
2007-10-14 09:35:11 UTC
Permalink
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?

RonB

http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&blog=reppert
Eric Belton
2007-10-14 10:04:06 UTC
Permalink
Sorry, cant help (not even with 'O' level in English or my Degree in
gobbledegook)!

Basically, I think he is saying that he has no idea what is going on, but
will cover every possibility and hopefully get the forecast right for some
parts of Europe.

Eric Belton
Post by Ron Button
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?
RonB
http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&blog=repp
ert
Gianna
2007-10-14 10:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Button
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?
RonB
http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&blog=reppert
That is wonderful - the meanderings of a semi-literate writer who is forecasting
that he does not know what the weather will be.
What may be assumed from the piece is that he has his spelling checking facility
switched off. I have no view on his grammar checking facility, and neither it
seems does he.
--
Gianna

http://www.buchan-meteo.org.uk
* * * * * * *
Purbeckview
2007-10-14 10:48:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gianna
That is wonderful - the meanderings of a semi-literate writer who is forecasting
that he does not know what the weather will be.
What may be assumed from the piece is that he has his spelling checking facility
switched off. I have no view on his grammar checking facility, and neither it
seems does he.
Don't you just get p*ss*d off with over use of TLAs, e.g. Presumably
NAO = North Atlantic Ocean?

Oh sorry, TLA = Three Letter Abbreviation ;)
Weatherlawyer
2007-10-14 12:08:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Purbeckview
Post by Gianna
That is wonderful - the meanderings of a semi-literate writer who is forecasting
that he does not know what the weather will be.
What may be assumed from the piece is that he has his spelling checking
facility switched off. I have no view on his grammar checking facility, and
neither it seems does he.
....facility and neither, it seems, does he.
Post by Purbeckview
Don't you just get p*ss*d off with over use of TLAs, e.g. Presumably
NAO = North Atlantic Ocean?
ICD!
Gianna
2007-10-14 13:18:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherlawyer
Post by Gianna
That is wonderful - the meanderings of a semi-literate writer who is forecasting
that he does not know what the weather will be.
What may be assumed from the piece is that he has his spelling checking
facility switched off. I have no view on his grammar checking facility, and
neither it seems does he.
....facility and neither, it seems, does he.
LOL

Absolutely, in written English, but that would place a pause where I did not
want it. By implication. you do raise an interesting and frequently discussed
issue - is this written or spoken English? The favoured conclusion seems to be
'a mix of both'.
--
Gianna

http://www.buchan-meteo.org.uk
* * * * * * *
Graham P Davis
2007-10-14 12:25:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Purbeckview
Post by Gianna
That is wonderful - the meanderings of a semi-literate writer who is
forecasting that he does not know what the weather will be.
What may be assumed from the piece is that he has his spelling checking facility
switched off. I have no view on his grammar checking facility, and
neither it seems does he.
Don't you just get p*ss*d off with over use of TLAs, e.g. Presumably
NAO = North Atlantic Ocean?
National Audit Office? A Google search on NAO gives this, an American
insurance firm and Spanish pottery before it gets to some sites dealing
with the North Atlantic Oscillation.
--
Graham P Davis
Bracknell, Berks., UK
Send e-mails to "newsman" as mails to "newsboy" are ignored.
Richard Dixon
2007-10-14 14:41:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graham P Davis
National Audit Office? A Google search on NAO gives this, an American
insurance firm and Spanish pottery before it gets to some sites dealing
with the North Atlantic Oscillation.
I think you'll find it's Nasty Autumn Overcastness actually, Graham!

Richard
Alastair
2007-10-14 10:45:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Button
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?
RonB
http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&bl...
I assume you mean British English?

El Ninos happen when the Trade Winds falter, and the warm equatorial
water they have blown into the (southeast Asian) Warm Pool floods back
across the Pacific mainly to the west coast of South America. This
disrupts the Walker circulation (a series of high and low pressure
regions spaced around the equator) and so affects weather around the
Pacific and Indian Oceans, with inevitabley collateral damage in the
Atlantic regions.

With a La Nino, the water off the South American coast is unusually
colder than normal, the opposite to an El Nino. The global effects of
a La Nina are not as noticable as those of an El Nino, but do affect
the US especially its west coast. The American, Alan Reppert, thinks
that the current La Nina will also affect the western European climate
but does not know by how much or even how!

Any corrections to the above remarks would be welcome.

Cheers, Alastair.
Weatherlawyer
2007-10-14 12:03:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alastair
Post by Ron Button
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?
RonB
http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&bl...
I assume you mean British English?
El Ninos happen when the Trade Winds falter, and the warm equatorial
water they have blown into the (southeast Asian) Warm Pool floods back
across the Pacific mainly to the west coast of South America. This
disrupts the Walker circulation (a series of high and low pressure
regions spaced around the equator) and so affects weather around the
Pacific and Indian Oceans, with inevitabley collateral damage in the
Atlantic regions.
With a La Nino, the water off the South American coast is unusually
colder than normal, the opposite to an El Nino. The global effects of
a La Nina are not as noticable as those of an El Nino, but do affect
the US especially its west coast. The American, Alan Reppert, thinks
that the current La Nina will also affect the western European climate
but does not know by how much or even how!
Any corrections to the above remarks would be welcome.
Nice try. My take was to switch off when I realised he was talking
about an average of half a degree. The average is itself an average so
his fallacy in trying to insinuate such a thing into a weather model
is ridiculous.

As you, say the anomaly is based on air pressure and to say that it is
the winter months that are important in the system is also ridiculous
as the anomaly is present (or can be seen) in summer too, in fact any
and all of the months.

Negative NAOs can be seen with major volcanic eruptions. Or at least,
the spate of them that occurred in the last negative NAO led me to
suspect that. There was nothing noticeable on the charts when that
Yemeni mountain erupted.
Dave Cornwell
2007-10-14 14:16:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherlawyer
Post by Alastair
Post by Ron Button
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?
RonB
http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&bl...
I assume you mean British English?
El Ninos happen when the Trade Winds falter, and the warm equatorial
water they have blown into the (southeast Asian) Warm Pool floods back
across the Pacific mainly to the west coast of South America. This
disrupts the Walker circulation (a series of high and low pressure
regions spaced around the equator) and so affects weather around the
Pacific and Indian Oceans, with inevitabley collateral damage in the
Atlantic regions.
With a La Nino, the water off the South American coast is unusually
colder than normal, the opposite to an El Nino. The global effects of
a La Nina are not as noticable as those of an El Nino, but do affect
the US especially its west coast. The American, Alan Reppert, thinks
that the current La Nina will also affect the western European climate
but does not know by how much or even how!
Any corrections to the above remarks would be welcome.
Nice try. My take was to switch off when I realised he was talking
about an average of half a degree. The average is itself an average so
his fallacy in trying to insinuate such a thing into a weather model
is ridiculous.
As you, say the anomaly is based on air pressure and to say that it is
the winter months that are important in the system is also ridiculous
as the anomaly is present (or can be seen) in summer too, in fact any
and all of the months.
Negative NAOs can be seen with major volcanic eruptions. Or at least,
the spate of them that occurred in the last negative NAO led me to
suspect that. There was nothing noticeable on the charts when that
Yemeni mountain erupted.
....................................
I thought you'd be able to clear it up for us ;-)

Dave
Weatherlawyer
2007-10-14 14:50:03 UTC
Permalink
As you, say the....
As he said, the....
Bernard Burton
2007-10-15 17:21:48 UTC
Permalink
Just to let everybody know, when I opened the Accuweather web page, I
received 8 tracking cookies that installed themselves on my PC. Beware!

--
Bernard Burton
Wokingham, Berkshire, UK.

Satellite images at:
www.woksat.info/wwp.html
or
www.btinternet.com/~wokingham.weather/wwp.html
Post by Ron Button
Would somebody out there be willing to translate this into English... ?
RonB
http://www.accuweather.com/ukie/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&blog=repp
ert
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